ethiopiantimes

May 7, 2011

Ethiopian workers sacrifice salaries to construct dam, that will not be build in TPLF rigeme time

Filed under: Ethiopia — ethiopiantimes @ 7:14 pm
Tags: , , ,

Where will the money go? The tribal dictator ship, TPLF controls all Businesses, monoply on import export,They have their own bank. All these is divided among famlies,relatives, friends and collaborators.
Ethiopian workers from government and private institutions have pledged to sacrifice their one month’s salary towards the construction of a dam on the Nile River.

The workers will pay their one month salary in 12 monthly installments towards the project called the “Great Millennium Dam”.

The estimated cost of the dam is about 80 Billion Birr-about 5 Billion US Dollars but the Ethiopian government has a deficit of 4 Billion Birr towards the project in this years budget hence the help from its citizens.

Ethiopian Prime Minister Meles Zenawi recently appealed to Ethiopian people to unite and contribute towards the project which will greatly contribute to the social- economic development of the country.

Ethiopia is currently producing 2000 Mega watts but when completed, the Millennium dam will produce 5200 mw of hydro-power which will boost local consumption and export revenue.

Meanwhile, the Ethiopian opposition Coalition has shown a rare solidarity with government over the construction of the dam.

Forum for Justice and Democratic Dialogue Leader Beyene Petros said in Addis Ababa recently that the role of the opposition is not only to attack but provide support on government’s programmes that aim at boosting the country’s social- economic development.

This is according to a statement from Dorcas Chileshe First Secretary-Press at the Zambian Embassy in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Advertisements

If Egypt is gift of the Nile then Nile is gift of Ethiopia

Filed under: Egypt,Ethiopia,Kenya,Uganda — ethiopiantimes @ 7:02 pm
Tags: , , , , ,

The giggles started when the seventh journalist in a row said that his question was for Egypt’s water and irrigation minister, Mohamed Nasreddin Allam.

The non-Egyptian media gave him a bit of a hammering at last week’s talks in Addis Ababa for the nine countries that the Nile passes through.

Allam bared his teeth when a Kenyan journalist accused him of hiding behind “colonial-era treaties” giving his country the brunt of the river’s vital waters whether that hurt the poorer upstream countries or not.

“You obviously don’t know enough about this subject to be asking questions about it,” he snapped before later apologising to her with a kiss on the cheek.

Five of the nine Nile countries — Ethiopia, Uganda, Tanzania, Rwanda and Kenya — last month signed a deal to share the water that is a crucial resource for all of them. But Egypt and Sudan, who are entitled to most of the water and can veto upstream dams under a 1929 British-brokered agreement, refused.

The Democratic Republic of the Congo and Burundi have not signed yet either and analysts are divided on whether they will or not. Six Nile countries must sign the agreement for it to have any power but Egypt says even that wouldn’t change its mind. The five signatories — some of the world’s poorest countries — have left the agreement open for debating and possible signing for up to a year.

Tensions were clearly still running high after two days of negotiations in Addis and despite grinning around the table and constantly referring to each other as “my brother”, the ministers always seemed in danger of breaking into bickering.

When the Sudanese water minister said his country was freezing cooperation with the Nile Basin Initiative — the name given to the ten-year effort to agree on how to manage the river — Ethiopia’s water minister loudly protested to the media that his Sudanese colleague had not revealed that during their private meetings.

Highlighting the seriousness of the issue, Egyptian Foreign Minister Ahmed Abul Gheit and International Cooperation Minister Fayza Abul Naga, arrived in Addis Ababaon Wednesday to again meet Ethiopian Prime Minister Meles Zenawi.

It’s no surprise that the spat is getting a lot of press in both Ethiopia and Egypt.

“Egypt is a gift of the Nile,” people like to say in a country that worshipped the river as a God in ancient times. “If Egypt is a gift of the Nile, then the Nile is a gift of Ethiopia,” Ethiopians shoot back with growing confidence.

And they have a point. More than 85 percent of the waters originate in Ethiopia, which relies on foreign aid for survival and sees hydropower dams as a potential cash cow and central to its plans to become one of Africa’s only power exporters.

But Egypt is not for turning. Almost totally dependent on the Nile for its agricultural output (a third of its economy) and already worried about climate change, it is determined to hold onto its 55.5 billion cubic metres of water a year, a seemingly unfair share of the Nile’s total flow of 84 billion cubic metres.

The Egyptians point out that they don’t benefit from rains like the upstream countries. Everybody, it seems, has valid points. Nobody is budging. Now some regional analysts are even saying the row could turn into the world’s first major water war and similar thoughts are being expressed in cafes from Cairo all the way upriver to Dar es Salaam.

So what next? The nine countries are due to meet again in Nairobi sometime between September and November. But where is the way forward? Who will blink first? And who really should? Could this bickering turn violent?

Sudanese university honors Dictator’s wife, Azeb Mesfin as board member

Filed under: Azeb Mesfin,Ethiopia,Meles Zenawi — ethiopiantimes @ 9:47 am
Tags: , , ,


May 6, 2011 (ADDIS ABABA) – Ethiopia’s first lady Azeb Mesifin attended a ceremony at Sudan’s University of Information and Communications Technology (ICT) where she was invited to become an honorary board member of the institution in Khartoum.

JPEG – 33.7 kb
Azeb Mesfhin first Lady of Ethiopia

According to Walta Information Center, the invitation was made at the inaugural ceremony of the renamed ICT University formerly known as the Computer Man College, on May 2 in the presence of Sudanese president Omar Hassan al-Bashir.

“The young should use their education to serve their society, promote economic growth of their country, and improve the health situation of their people and enabling the use of ICT across the border to create understanding among people to live together peacefully”, she said at the occasion.

“Ethiopia and Sudan have long standing relations with cultural and historical ties” she said further recalling Sudanese generosity and hospitability in sheltering and assisting Ethiopians who were fleeing the Derg regime.

Mesfin, is well-known for her commitment in advocating for more women’s rights and leadership on the issue of women and girls.

The Sudanese university has pledged to offer a number of scholarships to meritorious Ethiopian young women in recognition to the commitments she has made towards ensuring girls’ education as part of the efforts to empower girls to escape poverty.

The first lady accompanied by Ambassador Haile Kiros Gesses, Ethiopian ambassador in Sudan, has also held discussions with the Ethiopian community members in Sudan on various issues of concern and on ways the Ethiopian Embassy in Sudan can further assist the Ethiopian community there.

At the conclusion of her visit, she attended a dinner hosted by the Sudanese first lady Fatima Khalid al- Bashir.

The wife of Ethiopian Prime Minister Meles Zenawi, Azeb Mesfin, is women’s right activist, businesswoman and Member of Parliament.

She is also the vice-president of Organization of African First Ladies against HIV/AIDS and founder and patron of Ethiopia’s National Initiative for Mental Health.

The political spouse is also known for her aggressive education work to teach rural Ethiopians about the issues of HIV/AIDS.

In January 2007, she was given the “Legacy of a Dream” award for her leadership and during an awards ceremony commemorating the life of the famous civil rights activist and leader Dr. Martin Luther King.

(ST)

Blog at WordPress.com.